URBAN NATION @ LOLLAPALOOZA FESTIVAL 2015

art cube from urban nation at lollapalooza 2015

The Lollapalooza festival was nothing short of explosive. The festival made a spectacular debut claiming success even before the festival was completed. The festival offered the attendees a chance to indulge in a once in a lifetime art experience. They constructed a magnificent installation in the middle Tempelhof airport.

art cube at urbannation lollapalooza festival

THE CUBE – was an installation that was used by seven artists to display master art pieces. These artists had horned their skills to perfection finding harmony between street art, and modern art. Approximated at eight meters, it included passages where visitors would have the relish of exploring the fine art that was hanging around.

URBAN NATION received an invite from Lollapalooza to attend the festival. URBAN NATION would fuse music in with the art and form a musical marriage. This collaboration would bring forth Europe’s Lollapalooza festival where people could come and enjoy art.

URBAN NATION is an organization, that supports young artists who have their eyes set to leave a mark on the urban scene. This Berlin based organization, brings together local and international artists together, to create projects on how to beautify urban spaces. The organization is set to help artists, access the best in inspiration and find audience to critic or applaud their work. The organization is non- profit and its initiatives and accomplishments are supported by exhibitions and local workshops.

URBAN NATION is a baby project by the Berliner Leben Foundation. This organization has been running under the guidance of Yasha Young. A foundation, by the name of Gewobag Gewobag founded the Berliner Leben foundation back in 2013. The aim of this was to provide platforms that promoted the general development of the city districts in Berlin.

The foundation, has its eyes set on equal participation and cultural integration that is important in keeping the society aware of their surroundings. They also focus on the needs of senior citizens, sport development and finding aid for youth who need funding.

The Lollapalooza is a festival that takes place annually. It is an amazing music platform where popular artists perform popular genres of music to multitudes of years. This festival invites a wide range of artists who take their time, to display the mastery of their crafts. People are in love with Lollapalooza simply because it offers a buffet of art displays and music ready to seduce the eras of the gods. This festival has proven to offer a free platform, where nonprofit based political groups, and visual artists find voice for their causes.

Molded and brought to life in 1991 by the melodious Perry Farrell who was famously known for Jane’s Addiction. Lollapalooza took a break in 1997 and stayed dormant till 2003. The festival took the chance to tour north America just as a way to advertise their epic return. The year 2004 was not such a good year for the festival due to low ticket sales.

Back in 2005 musician star Pharrell Williams worked with the sports entertainment company one known as C3 Presents.  The result of this collaboration stamped the festival as it is now. Grant Park in Chicago was to host the festival as a weekend destination kind of festival.

Lollapalooza has taken the festival to other locations like, Chile, Brazil and recently Berlin. Hosting to over 160,000 people during a period of 2-3 days where people indulge in various art forms and let their hair down.

“THE CUBE-Think out the box” held on September 12th -13th was the first alliance the Lollapalooza festival was having with Europe and expectations were high. Hosting both international acclaimed artists and local celebrity artists, the art spoke through and journalists took their time to collect information that they needed for their publications. The music was up to our expectations and the art did sooth our minds. It’s like a piece of nirvana.

The director of the festival Fruzsina Szep had these reassuring things to say “Lollapalooza is more than a music festival. It is a blend of music, fashion, art, food and cool projects for children,”, he added, “I am very excited about the artistic spirit that URBAN NATION will bring to our festival. It’s great that URBAN NATION has chosen to embrace this adventure and help us make Lollapalooza a one-of-a-kind Berlin festival.”

The festival was jam packed with renowned international artist who appreciate the festival platform. Appearances were made with artists like fat boy, muse and Sam smith just to mention but a few. Some of the pieces were created by famous faces such as, Telmo Miel, Alexis Dias, James Bullough, Case Maclaim, Tankpetrol from Manchester, and Li Hill just to mention but a few.

The marriage between URBAN NATION and Lollapalooza has proved to be fruitful. There are many plans to make it even more explosive every year!

 
Source: MuralForm

The History of Murals

Greek Mythology Morpheus Fresco Mural Charon

What is a mural?

A mural is a piece of art that is painted on walls. It can be on the inside of buildings or outside for public display. They are large and take artistic expertise to paint them. The artwork incorporates the architecture of the building to bring out the painting and the building as one.

There is an ongoing debate on whether the drawings that are on canvases then put up on the walls qualify as murals. It is an artistic style that has however been in use since the 19th century. Murals are on only on side walls; they can be on ceilings and floors.#

Brief history of murals

Murals date back to 30,000 BC from the earliest paintings in the Chauvet cave France. The largest numbers of paintings are from Egyptian tombs in 3150BC, Pompeii in 100BC-AD79 and Minoan places 1700-1600BC. The whole period within which ancient paintings are is known as the Upper Paleolithic times.

Dry plaster is how paintings were put together in the Middle Ages, the 14th century. Kerala mural painting is an example of fresco secco. When the technique of painting murals on wet plaster took root in Italy, circa 1300, wall painting quality grew. It is the age where mural painting began to take shape and become modern.

The best-known style of mural painting is Fresco, but there are many methods and techniques as shown by the Mexican muralism art movement that took significant root in modern times. The pioneers of this movement include Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco.

Fresco technique of mural painting utilizes water soluble paints and lime wash. Applying the mixture on large surface results in a wall painting. Once the mixture dries, the colors take shape. For millennia, another method known as the Marouflage technique has been in use.

Today, people appreciate murals even more, and the methods are different. They now incorporate oil painting which is very popular. There are abstract paintings and trickster murals that are known as Trompe-l’oeil. The significant change came about through the works of Graham Rust and Rainer Maria in the 1980’s. In Europe, oil painting has taken center stage and is in private and public buildings.

Mural painting is revolutionary and proves that walls and ceilings do not have to be plain. Now, wall paintings can be shown by transferring the wall art into a poster paper canvas and then paste on a wall. The art or photographic image gives the illusion of a realistic scene on the wall.

History of mural painting techniques

Fresco paintings are the earliest method used. It came from Italy and came from the word fresh. There are two categories of the art. Fresco is whereby you apply paint on plaster on the walls and ceilings whereas the Buon fresco technique, you paint in pigment and mix it with water on thin wet, lime layer of mortar or plaster. The wet plaster and the dye mix, and when it is dry, the reaction with air glues in place the particles of the pigment.

Fresco Decoration Pictorial Mexico Mural Cancun

Once the process is complete, the painting can last centuries with the pictures looking fresh, and the color is brilliant. Fresco painting is on dry plaster, and therefore the pigment needs a medium like glue, oil, or egg that will fix the pigment to the wall.

Mezzo fresco is another technique that paints on almost dry plaster and came to be in the 16th century by Ignazio Pozzo. The pigment will drive into the plaster lightly and give impeccable murals. The mezzo fresco style of painting considerably took over the Buon fresco method.

Materials used in mural painting

Over the centuries, different materials have been in use for wall painting and the evolution of the techniques has also seen to the change in the materials. The earliest known is the tempera painting which then gave way to oil painting in the 16th century.

Paintings once complete in the old days did not have any protection from sun rays. As the materials and times change, the application of varnish and protective acrylic has taken shape to guard the murals against UV sun rays.

The use of POP clay is what young muralists are using. They mix it with glue to make them even more durable. When the clay dries, you then paint with the colors you want and even apply varnish for protection.

Technology has taken its place in the mural painting. Digital techniques are now taking shape in a mural painting like wall scape. Mural painting has been in constant evolution over the years, and it continues to evolve to incorporate the use of modern materials and pictures.

Advantages of murals

Murals are imperative in the world of art and the contemporary world because they bring art to the public and make people more aware of art. Murals are expensive and take a significant amount of time that is why for a painting to be put up, there has to be a sponsor who is funding the project.

Murals are also a communication tool. You can use a wall painting to communicate the message that you wish the public to know. The size of the painting will attract the attention of the public which makes it an effective way of communicating a message.

Murals affect the attitudes of the people passing by them. Everyone gets their understanding of the painting, and they therefore add aesthetic value to the areas that they are put up. They can be a tourist attraction that brings improvement to the areas.

Murals can also be used as landscapes, especially because they are vast and hard to miss paintings. Every painting is unique, and it’s hard to mistake one for the other. Murals are a way of expression for the muralists. It is their way of speaking to people and the world. They command the attention of the people and leave their mark in the area for centuries to come

Murals are continually coming up, and most people are now aware of the existence of paintings, their artistic value and their significance in the community. They take time and patience to put up and with modern technology taking over, the evolution of muralism is even faster than before.

 
Source: MuralForm

Murals in the Market – what a beautiful scene!

murals in the market homepage

In collaboration with the Eastern Market Corporation and Knight Foundation, 1xRUN and Inner State Gallery curated and delivered a 9-day mural festival that thrilled locals and visitors to Detroit. There were series of events that activated the whole footprint of the Market which organizers believed will leave an everlasting impression on the Eastern Market.

Detroit’s 2016 mural festival was huge; it was a triumphant return to the city for the second year of its only international mural festival and more than 50 local and international artists were invited to add new arts throughout the city. You can check out the full list of artists on their website.

1010 murals in the market 2016

Over the last 5 years, 1xRUN and Inner State Gallery have produced more than 75 murals in the Eastern Market, with over 100 murals throughout Detroit city. On 2016 alone, 50 new murals were added to the city’s gallery.

Artists from as far as Paris, Singapore and Australia crowned the festival with breathtaking murals. New York’s Cey Adams, a renowned graffiti artist came along to exhibit his work alongside notables such as 1010 from Germany and Britain’s Mr. Jago.

Visitors had the chance to get up-close with the artists and culturally significant photographers during discussion panels. Cey Adams said he acknowledged the mass population that dropped by, inspired by what he does, that a city like Detroit is putting on a festival like Murals in the Market.

Pat Perry murals in the market 2016

Mexican Victor Quinonez, famous as Marka27 said he really enjoyed the city and the culture. Some of his works are on at hot spots such as Belmont Tunnels, L.A, and Hall of Fame in Spanish Harlem, N.Y and Five Points in Queens, New York.

For the native artist Pat Perry, who lives about half a mile from his mural in Eastern Market, the festival was an opportunity to use his artistic talent to inspire the enthusiasm of his neighbors. He thinks when people walk by the mural every day, they feel more value than if the wall is just an abandoned building.

What’s the impact?

With the production of these murals, every location has had a significant visual impact on the surrounding neighborhood. Not only that, there’s an increase in traffic to the areas, economic boom as well as increased security.

Felipe Pantone murals in the market 2016

Even more interesting, all events were free and open to the public as both the local and international artists looked to extend their artistry markets. And it was more than just artwork; from multiple art exhibitions, installations, children’s workshops, community events and live music, it was a great way to portray the spirit of Detroit. The festival brought more energy to Eastern Market and encouraged people to connect with each other and their city as well.

Visitors to Eastern Market are now treated to a batch of bright murals on every corner. And that was the goal of the organizers – to encourage people who have never visited the century-old Eastern Market and seen the renovated sheds in the area. It’s more exuberant today than it has ever been thanks to the public art that has expanded the footprint and the district at large.

 

 
Source: MuralForm

Yulia Brodskaya, Crafting Artwork With Paper

Yulia Brodskaya paper art of her name

Quilling is a form of art that includes the use of strips of paper that are rolled, molded, and stuck together to make decorative designs. This technique is what paper artist and illustrator Yulia Brodskaya employs to create lush, vibrant, three-dimensional pieces of art.

Come to think of it, the style was used heavily in the 19th century by women of relaxation who quilled their time away between tea and gin. Today, Brodskaya’s post-Baroque hued curls are attracting major clients including The Guardian, Nokia, New Scientist, just to mention a few in her portfolio.

Yulia Brodskaya paper art closeup of face with beautiful colours

Not many represent the credibility of a handmade technique of image making like Brodskaya. She claims that digital pictures are not as fascinating to her as handmade ones. Of course, she admits that there are those digital artworks that she appreciates but they don’t arouse such enthusiasm like handmade artworks do.

Furthermore, Brodskaya gets her inspiration from a sheet of paper. Sounds awesomely ridiculous, yet that’s the origin of her magnificent artworks, ‘’If I manage to find some new unusual paper or card, I immediately begin to imagine the new ways of using it in my work’’, she proclaims. Her love of the paper is the reason she enjoys paper crafting.

She also admits that it took her some time to realize her own way of working with the material. Actually, Brodskaya had no idea that the technique she uses is called quilling. Despite everything, she’s keen on it and not prepared to shift on to anything else. Of course, he has tried both origami and collages but the quilling technique turned out to be her favorite.

Yulia Brodskaya paper artwork of face profile

Brodskaya is not only unique in her style of art; her monetizing strategy turns out to be different too. She doesn’t sell her original artworks, she creates the works for specific projects and her clients use the images of the paper works for their own purposes such as magazines and advertising campaigns. And she has won over world-famous companies including The New York Times Magazine, Starbucks, Hermes, Sephora and Godiva.

So where do her original works go? They are well kept in the good hands of Oprah Winfrey, Country Music Association, Ferrero, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and other private collectors.

Brodskaya’s services are undoubtedly on demand but making paper-based images for clients has its challenges too. For instance, once the paper has been stuck together, there’s no undo option, so she always cautions her clients about this issue in advance. Nonetheless, she gets enough time to think and consider the alternatives as the working process is quite slow.

Yulia Brodskaya paper artwork of a tray for advertising campaign

One of her initial tasks was to create seven type-based pictures for the G2 section of the Guardian newspaper. She had only three and a half days to finish a series of texts primarily for Christmas season. She barely slept while undertaking this project as the quilling process is so time-consuming and she was on a tight deadline. But, the dividends were huge.

Brodskaya has also worked with Havas Group and terms the project as one of her favorites. On this one, she enjoyed the image-centered areas of her creativity, as much of the time she was creating designs to present themes in the organization’s 2008 annual report. It was a report with a distinction as it was printed with Brodkaya’s images on one side and the company’s information on the other. With quilling technique, she rendered a picture of a human brain and a lady with streaming hair – decorative work that represented her creativity.

Bio

Yulia Brodskaya was born in Moscow, Russia then moved to the United Kingdom in 2004. Before moving to the UK, she was interested in creative art practices including Origami, Collage, Textile Painting and Fine Art practices. She continued her education in art at the University of Hertfordshire and graduated with an MA in Graphics Communication degree in 2006.

She kept on experimenting and exploring ways of uniting each of the things she likes most; paper, typography, and profoundly definite hand-made specialty objects. She has quickly earned a global recognition for her imaginative paper illustrations and continues to create paper designs for clients around the world.

Many of her beautifully crafted paper works are on her website http://ift.tt/2k4stXM.

 

 
Source: MuralForm

Artbot – the new artist on the block

roboart - wall painting robot

In Korea, apartment buildings dominate Seoul city and large murals as high as 75m command the walls of the apartments. You’ll be forgiven to think that the best artists from around the world created the murals, yet no human applied paint on a single art.

Introducing Artbot – a robot for painting exterior walls of apartments or large buildings. The robot breaks an image into several small pieces to paint the entire picture. Made and used by Korean company Roboprint, it’s a safer, quicker and more economic form of painting building’s exterior than people can do. Using Artbot is less expensive than the traditional labor painting by up to 80% plus there’s no risk of human accidents working in high places.

Artbot also works on highways and expressways where sound proof walls can be transformed into delightful masterpieces. The apartment repainting sector in Korea is approximately a $350 million industry and with the Artbot’s efficiency, these figures are bound to shoot. Apartment repainting helps to increase the value of a property as well as the visual appeal. Even those dull storage tanks in industrial settings can be transformed into artistic murals and make the surrounding lively.

Technology

The wall painting robot system relies on different technologies to execute various tasks.

The first is Real-Painting Technology. This allows the robot to create a necessary color by spraying 4 color paints (CMYK), one after another through a nozzle situated at the head.

Another one is Image Splitting Technology which is specifically what creates an image. Since the robot works on relatively large wall paintings, it splits an image into many small pieces to paint the whole image. This allows expressing a wide image as one real wall paint. Moreover, selective or partial repainting can be possible regardless of the possibility that painting work is disrupted because of machine faults or external causes.

Perhaps one that saves on a major challenge that artists usually experience is the Irregular Structure Painting Technology. Yes, painting on uneven surfaces is overwhelming but it can’t beat the Artbot. The spout of the robot keeps a setting distance from a surface to be painted at least 20mm while the head takes after an irregular or a curved surface. Along these lines, painting a twisted surface is possible.

The final and one that cut’s significantly on labor costs is the Workability Improvement Technology. This reduces work preparation time by a level checking gadget Print leveling by a lift. The robot painting system is also controlled remotely and wirelessly.

The Artbot has now put Roboprint in a dominant position in the building repainting market. And to meet resident’s expectations of increasing the value of their apartments and promote customer satisfaction, the company shows luxurious designs along with their smart painting robot. Their mission is clear; transform Seoul city into an urban museum.

 

 
Source: MuralForm

Shamsia Hassani – voice of the Afghan woman

mural artwork by Shamsia Hassani

One of Afganistan’s first well-known female graffiti artists, Shamsia Hassani creates vibrant murals and paintings portraying women as strong, autonomous beings. In all her work, Hassani usually paints women in Burqas and endeavors to reveal the woman under the burqa. She often draws women in symbolic shapes and adds symbols of the atmosphere that flows around her plus her life experiences.

Most of her murals often show women carrying and/or playing musical instruments which give them a voice for self-expression. Coming from a background where women are usually overlooked, Hassani believes painting women in public can encourage other people to look at women differently.

She uses blue in many of her paintings not only because it’s her favorite color but also because blue is associated with freedom. And for Hassani, freedom is not the removal of the burqa, freedom is to have peace.

Hassani also uses her own art to help convey positive changes to people and particularly to wash away the bad memories of a long long-time war that had occurred in her country.  Even today the place is not entirely safe as Hassani has had to leave some of her street art unfinished in the past to run for her safety.

And these days is not necessarily war, it is political unrest in her country that makes the streets unsafe. And some other times it’s simply because she’s a woman painting in the public space that puts her at risk. She’s reported herself that on several occasions’ people have verbally abused her and even tried to stop her from working.

But she has the will and the heart of a lion, she dreams and executes. Sometime back her family discouraged her from tagging a specific area on the grounds that a bomb had exploded nearby. Of course, it wasn’t safe for her to wait there. She took a photo of the wall, printed a massive image of it and used the picture as a canvas – how smart!

Her concept of working her graffiti out as paintings applied onto prints of pictures taken from various places created a collection she called ‘’Dreaming Graffiti’’. Works from this gallery are easy to transport because they do not adorn street walls. These images have made to exhibitions in the United Kingdom, Australia, Germany, Switzerland, India, Vietnam, and the United States among others.

During her three-month residency at the Hammer Museum in the Los Angeles, Hassani met with local artists and her stay is appreciated by her mural at 4900 W. Adams Boulevard. She also exhibited her work at the Seyhoun Gallery, West Hollywood.

Her story was an inspiration to many and her connection to the Hammer community continues to develop. To the Afghan women, Shamsia Hassani continues to push for their recognition through art while giving them strength to overcome social oppression.

Biography

Born in 1988 in Tehran, Iran, Shamsia Hassani grew up in Afghanistan. She started graffiti in December 2010 when graffiti artist CHU made a visit from the United Kingdom in a workshop organized by Combat Communications in Kabul. Out of the 8 local artists that attended the work, Hassani has been the most outstanding out of her exemplary work and what she stands for. In 2009, she was once shortlisted for the Afghan Contemporary Art Prize.

She received her bachelor’s degree in Arts in 2010 and a master’s degree in Visual Arts in 2014 from Kabul University. She co-founded Berang Art Organization with the aim of promoting contemporary art and culture in Afghanistan through workshops, seminars, programs and exhibitions.

 
Source: MuralForm

Juxtapoz Online Magazine – digital art destination

juxtapoz homepage screenshot taken march 2017

Established by artists and collectors back in 1994, Juxtapoz is an online arts and culture journal that has remained a genuine champion of the contemporary art world. Made as the absolute opposite of the stuffy, antiquated scene, the San Francisco-based publication promoted and continues to promote artists, genres and galleries that were often neglected.

The online magazine’s staff from in-house in San Francisco has remained vigilant over the years, representing those with incredible potential and whom they believe in, and endeavoring to make art accessible to a worldwide audience. The magazine launched a mission to connect Surrealist traditions of figurative art, contemporary popular culture, psychedelic rock posters, and side show crack banners, Zap comics and EC comic books.

Juxtapoz has enjoyed two decades of online publishing covering several genres; from photography to painting, fashion, design, graffiti to street art. What they have done over the years is ensuring they have artists who have represented each of the specific styles and this is evident in the online magazine.

Why Juxtapoz stands out

Juxtapoz has remained relevant and a significant publication both in print and online for several years. Their success is cultivated by the mix of sharing creative energy to those interested in transforming art into a lifestyle.

They’ve never been comfortable covering one particular style – they continue to broaden their scope by mixing and matching content for art enthusiasts. Each of Juxtapoz’s monthly issues highlights photography, design, fashion, painting, graffiti, museums and current issues. The featured artists also continue to create fascinating and provocative arts.

Readership has also increased especially with the boom of social media. The magazine’s chief editor Evan Pricco acknowledges that the internet has been a game-changer by blending a bunch of creative arts together on the same platform. This includes lowbrow graffiti and street art. Readers also respect the fact that there’s so much going on in the field of art every month and they can also join the print magazine or online and have a piece of it.

The graffiti and street art cultures have grown with the internet over the years and have used the ability to share information through social media. The ability for someone in South America to see their comrade in Paris sharing a mural they saw in the street broadened the magazine’s audience. The works of famous graffiti and street artists like Blu, Conor Harrington, Ericailcane and visual artist Herbert Baglione, just to mention, are now easy to spot and share.

The rise of creative culture has also seen more people becoming interested in art school, design jobs, film, photography and even painting. There are millions who want to attend art fair these days and that translates to a wide fan base. Others want to take street art photos and create Instagram murals. All these fuels the magazine’s readership and Juxtapoz, in turn, tries to inspire their audience with works from various artists.

With a new issue every four weeks, the magazine gives artists the opportunity to create things that they want to create. The big part of it is making art accessible to people who are frightened by institutional art.

 
Source: MuralForm